Posts Tagged ‘Northern Hawk owl’

Canada 2017- Part Deux

March 10, 2017

Positioning myself well, I grabbed one of the few flight opportunities of the morning as this docile bird made a short flight.

Montreal
The plan was to try and work the Great Grays again this morning. I was beginning to feel better as the days progressed, but still had little appetite due to the lingering malaise. The adrenalin of seeing Chouette Lapone’s at eyeball level was helping though! We had great views of two birds at close range this morning. One bird was roosting and quite docile. None afforded the opportunities that we had yesterday. Just as we were leaving, the one bird began to get active and I managed to grab a quick series of shots as it sailed silently past.

We headed north on the two hour drive to Quebec, hoping to try for the Hawk Owl before dark. There were few birds to see on the trip, but we managed to car-tick several Northern Shrikes, a distant Snowy Owl atop a silo and a lone Rough-legged Hawk (surprisingly scarce) as we sped through open flatlands of farmland.

Quebec
We quickly found the area the bird had been seen in. We bumped into a couple of NJ birders who had been there for a couple of hours and had failed to see the bird. We knew it had been seen the day before, but as the light waned and the clouds closed in we had to reluctantly give in to defeat. On the way to our hotel, we found a distant Snowy Owl (seen earlier by the NJ guys) in a tree far from the road.

The following morning we returned to beautiful blue, cloudless skies. Standing on the railroad tracks, it was only a matter of minutes before Mr. Mantlik noticed the bird perched on a tall spruce, right next to the car. BOOM! Northern Hawk Owl in the bag.

Frank is happy! After a dismal non-event yesterday, all was well this morning – Hawk Owl -crippling views! (Frank Mantlik)

Thankfully the bird flew towards us and perched in the hedgerow and allowed us to grab some shots for 20 minutes before flying back across the road –  a veritable bullet with wings.

Northern Hawk Owl, doing what Northern Hawk Owls do best this morning – be conspicuous and confiding!

Frank Gallo getting to grips. ( Frank Mantlik)

Truly charismatic birds, seeing a Hawk Owl is always a top shelf experience. We watched the bird hunting in a suburban yard, hunting in a ravine, drinking snow from the crook of a tree, and generally being inconspicuous. If this is where it was the previous afternoon, it was no wonder we didn’t find it.

Since further photo opps were not forthcoming, we bucked out of there and headed south of the river and north towards La Pocatiere, to try and spend time looking for two Gyrfalcons that had been seen in that area recently – a white bird, and a stunning, dark chocolate bird.

Nick takes up the narrative and writes, Very pleased with our morning hawk owl experience, we crossed to the east side of the St. Lawrence River and drove north another 90 minutes for our third and final leg of the trip. Two Gyrfalcons, one white and one dark, had been frequenting the agricultural fields between La Pocatiere and Kamouraska. We drove a loop through prime Gyr habitat, focusing on those areas where the birds had been seen, but came up empty. Night in La Pocatiere.

Nick scoping a birdless horizon silhouetted by a stunning sunset over the St. Lawrence

We had one last shot for the Gyrs on Tuesday morning, again greeted by beautiful light with which to work. It was very cold, down to 1 degree Fahrenheit, but the temps warmed quickly thanks to the abundant sunshine. A thick frost had coated the vegetation overnight, making for some stunning scenery.

We drove the Gyr loop again without sign of a raptor of any kind. The only bird of prey we saw on two tours through fine habitat was a single SNOWY OWL on our way out-of-town.

Distant Snowy Owl surveying its wintry home.

We were actually quite struck by the absence of bird life in general. This was not surprising given the barren Arctic-like landscape of the agricultural fields. What did surprise us was the dearth of life on the St. Lawrence River itself. Though we did not set aside much time for river viewing, we were treated to sprawling views of the mostly frozen waterway from several locations. Literally the only birds noted were a few Common Mergansers. Not even a single gull fly by!

We also thought we would stumble across flocks of finches or waxwings at some point, but we would have been completely skunked on those if Julian hadn’t spotted a group of PINE GROSBEAKS while driving through Kamouraska along the river.”

Male Pine Grosbeak!

We checked a lot of silos, but came up blank – my recent shite luck with Gyrfalcons seems to continue, this is the 8th try for 6 different birds in the last three years..what the flock!!!

Despite this, it was a truly wonderful four days, with some great birds, amazing photo opps and the experience of having one land on your tripod was out of this world! The French birders we met were so friendly and eager to share news of the local birds.

I need to give a big shout out to local Montreal birder (and ace photographer) Simon Bolyn, who was so gracious to my request for help, that it helped make the trip logistics a bit more reassuring. Brian Kulvete from CT and Justin Lawson from VT were both equally helpful in providing “boots-on-the-ground” info that helped make the trip great. Thanks guys!

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Canada 2017 – Part 1

March 5, 2017
After (presumably) mistaking one of the photographer's neck warmer for some juicy, furry rodent, when she ducked, it had to re-orient and chose to do it from Nick's tripod, landing at point blank range between both of us. Bold and fearless this bird had been actively hunting, and had not been baited at all. A once-in-a-lifetime experience for all present, this moment subsequently went viral.

After (presumably) mistaking a photographer’s neck warmer for some juicy, furry rodent, this Great Gray had to reorient itself when her ‘victim’ ducked. It chose to do it from Nick’s tripod, landing at point blank range between both of us. Bold and fearless this bird had been actively hunting, and had not been baited at all. A once-in-a-lifetime experience for all present, this moment subsequently went viral. (Photos by Julian Hough. CLICK ON IMAGES FOR HI-RES VERSIONS)

Arranged with military precision, birds had been researched, their locations marked on maps with gps co-ordinates and bags were packed. However, finding myself holed up in the bathroom, less than 24 hours prior to a 4-day birding assault on Quebec, wasn’t in my plans. My son Alex had been sick with a virulent stomach bug and he had kindly shared it with me. Confined to bed and subsisting just on Pedialyte I crashed out all day. When I awoke just after midnight, I felt a tad bit better. I downed some imodium, grabbed a pillow and blanket and collapsed into the back of Frank’s car for the long drive to Montreal.

The main intent was a simple one; find and photograph Great Gray Owls near Montreal  and drive north to Quebec for Northern Hawk Owl and Gyrfalcon. In the last month, there had been a small and localized incursion of Great Gray Owls into the Montreal area

From l to r: Nick Bonomo, Frank Mantlik, Frank Gallo and myself, La Pocatiere, Quebec.

From l to r: Nick Bonomo, Frank Mantlik, Frank Gallo and myself, La Pocatiere, Quebec.

The group de force were Frank Mantlik, Frank Gallo, Nick Bonomo and myself. Nick takes up the story on his blog (www.shorbirder.com):
“We B-lined to Montreal, specifically to Refuge Faunique Marguerite-D’Youville south of the city itself. We were met by another birder in the parking lot as we arrived who was there the day before and informed us how slow it was on Friday – only one bird seen, and not terribly active. It had been windy and cold then. Saturday was a different story; we were greeted by sunny skies, warming temps, and zero wind. As we would soon find out, the birds would cooperate today.

We encountered three GREAT GRAY OWLS on this day at the refuge. What was supposed to be a few-hour visit turned into most of the day. We could not pull ourselves away, and who would want to? The birds (one in particular) performed above and beyond anyone’s reasonable expectations.

Crippling views! A superb Great Gray Owl. The prominent, buffy fringes to the primaries and browner secondaries, age this as a first-year.

Crippling views! A superb Great Gray Owl. The prominent, buffy fringes to the primaries and browner secondaries, age this as a first-year.

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ggow

Great Gray Owl – incoming! An active bird, it allowed us to position ourselves for some potential flight shots as it hunted along a treeline- and we were not disappointed.

One particularly actively hunting individual put on quite a show for the crowd. It spent several hours searching for prey rather close to the trail and made several short flights, from perch to perch, in its pursuit of a meal. After a couple hours of watching this owl and enjoying every second, it decided to fly back across the trail, something it had done a couple times already this morning. After a couple hours of watching this owl and enjoying every second, it decided to fly back across the trail, something it had done a couple times already this morning. Rather than passing over the group to the other side, it nearly landed on a woman’s head before touching down on my tripod directly in front of me. I stood there stunned for a few moments, unsure of what exactly to do.”

Nick and I were stunned to be literally face to face with this amazing beast!

GGOW up close and personal (Frank Mantlik)

GGOW up close and personal (Frank Mantlik)

“Before you go on assuming that this bird was lured in with pet store mice, you would be mistaken. That sort of behavior is highly frowned upon at this refuge, and we chose to come here largely based on this. Through a day and a half there with three owls we didn’t see any sign of anyone doing anything like that. A local birding couple that walks here once or twice per week has never seen anything of the kind here either. The refuge staff patrols the trails here, and everyone’s behavior was top notch. Nobody even ventured more than a couple feet off the trail, as per park rules. It was impressive. We had been following this bird for 2+ hours at close range before this happened, and it only approached us this once…the bird was in heavy hunting mode and seemed to use the tripod as just another survey post for a few minutes before moving onto the next treetop. Even after it landed on my tripod it spent most of its time looking away from the humans onto the ground for prey as it was doing from the trees, with only the occasional head turn towards me or the crowd. Certainly didn’t feel like it was looking to us for food at all. These are notoriously tame birds to begin with, so I don’t entirely understand why some photographers feel the need to bait them. You obviously don’t need to feed GGOWs to get killer photos!

Before we knew it, it was 2pm and we were dehydrated and sunburned. We left the refuge on a major high from our experience there. After some regrouping and refocusing, the last couple hours of daylight were spent unsuccessfully searching fields to the west of the city for Snowy Owls and other open country birds like Gray Partridge, etc. We did stumble across this Barred Owl in a farmhouse backyard. Night near Montreal after celebratory beer & food!”

A nice backlit Barred owl at dusk posed for some photos by the road.

A nice backlit Barred owl at dusk posed for some photos by the road.