Archive for the ‘Pelagics’ Category

BBC August Overnight Pelagic

August 28, 2015
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This summary is taken from a post written by Jeremiah Trimble and posted to MASSbird:
This weekend 58 lucky birders explored the offshore waters of Massachusetts, south of Nantucket.
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It was an absolutely incredible trip,and that is an understatement. To the say the trip was a success would be an understatement! We found our first ever White-tailed Tropicbirds (andhad two species of tropicbird in one day!), set trip high counts for White-faced Storm-Petrel, Audubon’s Shearwater, Band-rumped Storm-Petrel
and Pomarine Jaeger and had such an amazing variety of rarities on top of these including Black-capped Petrel, Bridled Tern and South Polar Skua. In a later email, I will provide a narrative of the two day trip but to summarize, here are the major avian highlights in brief:
2 Black-capped Petrel
202 Audubon’s Shearwater
28 White-faced Storm-Petrel
161 Leach’s Storm-Petrel
23 Band-rumped Storm-Petrel
4 White-tailed Tropicbird (two adults and 2 immatures)
1 Red-billed Tropicbird (an immature bird)
17 Pomarine Jaeger
1 Long-tailed Jaeger
1 South Polar Skua
1 Bridled Tern
2nd Cal-yr Bridled Tern

2nd Cal-yr Bridled Tern

 

Leach's Petrel

Leach’s Petrel

 

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Imm Red-billed Tropicbird

 

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Imm Red-billed Tropicbird (left) and Imm White-tailed Tropicbird. This composite of two birds seen on this trip shows the important pattern of the greater coverts – blackish on Red-billed Tropicbird and white on White-tailed. Talking with Nick about assessing this in the field is essentially the dark primaries extend only 1/2 way up the leading edge in White-tailed.

 

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White-faced Storm-Petrel

 

White-faced Storm Petrel

White-faced Storm-Petrel

 

Adult White-tailed Tropicbird - a world tick and a bogey bird for me finally laid to rest!

Adult White-tailed Tropicbird – a world tick and a bogey bird for me finally laid to rest!

 

Adult White-tailed Tropicbird - a world tick and a bogey bird for me finally laid to rest!

Adult White-tailed Tropicbird

 

2nd Cal-yr Pomarine Jaeger (all juv primaries replaced with p10 almost fully grown)

2nd Cal-yr Pomarine Jaeger (all juv primaries replaced with p10 almost fully grown)

 

3rd Cal-yr Long-tailed Jaeger. A cool bird and my first non-juv/adult plumage. Aged by the largely brown underwing and dark cap. Although the markings on the breast seemed suggestive of a breast band and the tail projections looked spikey, any initial thoughts of Parasitic were dispelled by a combination of features and behavior, notably the short bill, grey-toned upperparts with a darker trailing edge and 2-3 white primary shafts all being pro-Long-tailed. In discussion with Nick, he mentioned the lack of any white primary bases on the underwing which is probably diagnostic (?) in itself at this age for LTJA

3rd Cal-yr Long-tailed Jaeger. A cool bird and my first non-juv/adult plumage. Aged by the largely brown underwing and dark cap. Although the markings on the breast seemed suggestive of a breast band and the tail projections looked spikey, any initial thoughts of Parasitic were dispelled by a combination of features and behavior, notably the short bill, grey-toned upperparts with a darker trailing edge and 2-3 white primary shafts all being pro-Long-tailed. While discussing it with Nick Bonomo, he brought attention to the lack of any white primary bases on the underwing as a pro-LTJA feature – in itself possibly diagnostic (?) for this age for LTJA.

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Adult Pomarine Jaeger. Broken breast band and clean flanks suggest male. Note inner primary moult taking place; an adult jaeger in late August in primary moult is almost certainly a Pomarine; both Parasitic and Long-tailed are not moulting.

 

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Band-rumped Storm-Petrel

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2nd Cal-yr Pomarine Jaeger at sunset

 

The CT contingent of the trip

The CT contingent of the trip (photo courtesy of Tina Green)

Here are links to two general checklists for each of the two days of the trip which include great images by Jeremiah Trimble.

Checklists:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24748705
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24750035
We would like to first of all thank Ida Giriunas, as always, for her efforts
in organizing and pushing for these trips to happen. She has helped so many birders enjoy the offshore birds of Massachusetts! Thanks!
Also,thanks to Captain Joe Huckemeyer and the crew of the Helen H.
Thanks as well to my fellow tripleaders; Nick Bonomo, Doug Gochfeld, Julian Hough, and Luke Seitz.
Their skills at identifying and spotting birds, communicating to participants and getting everyone on each bird was critical.
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October 10, 2014
"Arrg..me mateys" From left to right (back): Frank Mantlik, Phil Rusch, Julian Hough, Nick Bonomo, Pat Dugan. (Front): Sara Zagorski and Tina Green

“Arrg..me mateys” From left to right (back): Frank Mantlik, Phil Rusch, Julian Hough, Nick Bonomo, Pat Dugan. (Front): Sara Zagorski and Tina Green

A stalwart band of CT birders headed off to Hyannis on 22nd for the (almost) annual  Brookline Birdclub Overnight Pelagic trip to the deepwater canyons and continental shelf 100 miles south-east of Cape Cod.

The marine forecast was for rough seas but downgraded quickly to a forecast that amounted to 4-6ft waves and a 15-20 knot wind out of the NE. It was going to be rough. We were just glad we were going!

24th August

Hopped up on Bonine, we left at 6am. The sail out was quiet, but reaching the cold water of the Nantucket Shoals, several  Cory’s and Great Shearwaters made an appearance as did two brief Parasitic Jaegers and a distant juvenile Long-tailed Jaeger provided far from satisfying looks.

It's all smiles early doors...but wait for it!

It’s all smiles early doors…but wait for it!

The ride out to the shelf edge was again quiet, save for the odd phalarope and accompanying Wilson’s Petrel and a single Leach’s Petrel that powered by the boat. Cory’s and Great Shearwaters were seen and as we neared the deeper and warmer water, the expected Audubon’s Shearwaters began to be seen in rather unusually high numbers. Audubon’s  like the deep and warm water and are a sign that we are in the “zone” for the offshore specialties.

Scopoli's Shearwater? A bird with obvious white tongues protruding into the primary bases, but is it enough to call?

Scopoli’s Shearwater? A bird with obvious white tongues protruding into the primary bases, but is it enough to call?

Chimp-o-mania! How you really identify Scopoli's on a pelagic.

Chimp-o-mania! How you really identify Scopoli’s on a pelagic.

It was while watching Audubon’s, that the hoped-for shout of “White-faced Storm Petrel” went out and despite the increasing wind and swells, this bird showed really well for everyone around the boat. It would be the only one of the trip.

The only White-faced Storm Petrel of the trip (but you only need one!) performed for everyone!

The only White-faced Storm Petrel of the trip (but you only need one!) performed for everyone!

By now, the increasing wind and gathering seas had begun to hamper our passage eastwards along the canyon walls and we were not able to cover as much of this part of the ocean as we would have hoped. The 2012 trip had been able to get out farther to the east and it was this area that had yielded the Barolo Shearwater, good numbers of Band-rumped, several White-faced and the Red-billed Tropicbird.

Still we ploughed on, stopping to chum. The rough seas made for an unpleasant afternoon for a lot of participants…nothing is worse than trapped in an aluminum can bobbing in the ocean a 100 miles offshore!

More Wilson’s and Leach’s appeared and then the first of only a handful of Band-rumped’s appeared in the slick. Audubon’s began to wrack up into double-digits as did the amount of people chumming – the pitching and rolling rendered a good number of participants seasick and retired them to their bunks. A couple more Band-rumped’s performed, but they were few and far between, with Wilson’s and Leach’s predominating as usual.

Leach's Petrel

Leach’s Petrel

Then, about 3pm, I noticed Marshall and Nick looking quite intently in one direction. Out on the far horizon, a very distant bird was arching across the horizon. It looked interesting…distant shearwater..maybe…or something else? I went over to join them and we got on the bird and Marshall, in his excited feverish way, bellowed out “Get on this bird!”. The bird rose up, and Marshall shouted out “it’s a pterodroma”, and as it banked, I saw a white tail and I blurted out “Black-capped Petrel!” The pitching of the boat and distance made viewing difficult and only a few people were able to get on it. As the bird dropped against a backdrop of the sea, it became obvious to the three of us at least, that it was quite grey-looking and didn’t seem to sport much of a noticeable dark cap. Obviously troubling, it didn’t quite have the look of a distant Black-capped that we were all familiar with..“It might not be a Black-capped!” Marshall uttered as he attempted to direct people to a bird that was quickly getting distant and difficult to see.  I am sure at that point, all – well..at least my thoughts entertained the notion that this grayish pterodroma, with pale underwings and no obvious collar MIGHT be a Cahow!  In those few seconds, despite the distance, Ian Davies managed to grab a couple of shots that when blown up clearly showed a Black-capped Petrel.  A great bird for Massachusetts!

As the light waned, several people retired to partake in the baked ziti dinner. Several of us remained on the top deck, still scanning as dusk encroached. To his credit and diligent scanning Marshall again picked up a bird on the horizon, and shouted out “Black-capped Petrel. Distant. Going left!” We managed to keep on the distant bird and while looks were better in that it was identifiable, even at this range, it was far from satisfying. People downstairs, being made aware that something was going on by the muffled commotion and assumedly choking on their ziti, scrambled to get out of the cabin. Amazingly enough, the bird turned and began to come toward the boat…closer…closer, until it was clear it was making a beeline for us.  Finally the bird came in and gave one close pass along the starboard side for photographic purposes and gave everyone a great look as it banked and veered away!

Black-capped Petrel - one of three birds, but thankfully after playing cat and mouse finally raked itself down the side of the boat for some ggod looks (photo Nick Bonomo)

Black-capped Petrel – one of three birds, but thankfully after playing cat and mouse finally raked itself down the side of the boat for some good looks (photo Nick Bonomo)

25th August

A rough night ensued- tethered to the ocean floor like a cork in a bucket! I slept hardly a wink and dawn greeted me feeling really crap! Not quite nauseous, but definitely felt better, a fact reinforced when I saw what Ian Davies looked like! He looked like I felt. He recounted how, minutes earlier, he had managed to lift his head from puking to see a distant, and third Black-capped Petrel slink silently across the horizon before most had awoken.

I had taken up a sole position at the front of the boat when out in front I noticed a gleaming white bird up ahead. I knew instantly what it was going to be and just as I opened my mouth to shout, someone from the stern bellowed out “TROPICBIRD. 11 ‘O CLOCK”. We motored up on the sitting bird, getting great looks. Obviously a Red-billed on bill size, it suddenly took flight only to be engaged by a Pomarine Jaeger that appeared out of nowhere. The birds put on a great fly-by, but I failed, through sheer photographic incompetence to secure good images!

Red-billed Tropicbird - really two for two on these trips...can't I get a White-tailed? Canna, canna

Red-billed Tropicbird – really two for two on these trips…can’t I get a White-tailed? Canna, canna

Red-billed Tropicbird - an example of how to kill a fly-by mega! (Photo Nick Bonomo)

Red-billed Tropicbird – an example of how to kill a fly-by mega! (Photo Nick Bonomo)

We gradually made our way back towards Nantucket shoals. At some point, I decided to take a break, and awoke to the alarming slowing of the boat. Running upstairs, I was greeted with the news that a South Polar Skua made a pass down the side of the boat, but despite it being close and a huge dark bird, it somehow suddenly vanished into the ether! You schnooze, you lose!

The last bit of excitement, came when we chased down a juvenile dark, Long-tailed Jaeger, that put on a great show trying to out run us.

Stunning dark juv. Long-tailed Jaeger - Fwaaww....look at that rump!!

Stunning dark juv. Long-tailed Jaeger – Fwaaww….look at that rump!!

All in all, another productive, amazing pelagic despite not being able to explore as far east as we had wanted to. Thanks to Ida and the Brookline Bird Club for organizing this trip!

 

 

Planned It! Booked It! DID IT! California September 2013

October 17, 2013
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Alvaro Jaramillo (centre) holds court on the “New Captain Pete” as we hit the continental shelf off of Half Moon Bay.

After a nice early breakfast courtesy of the Fairfield Inn, Phil Rusch, Nick Bonomo, Simon Harvey and myself found ourselves at dawn in Pillar Point Harbor, all prepped for a pelagic out of Half Moon Bay, San Mateo County run by an old acquaintance, Alvaro Jaramillo. I had done several trips out of Monterey in the late 80s and mid-90s with Debi Shearwater but had never ventured out of Half Moon Bay, conveniently only 35 minutes drive from SFO airport! This particular tour of duty involved a couple of Debi’s trips but while birding was OK, for seasoned veterans it was lacklustre. It seemed all the most interesting birds were being seen in Half Moon Bay this fall! So Saturday 14th September so us ready to rock and roll…and roll we did..it was a bit bumpy on the way out!

It was great to see Alvaro and catch up a bit – we had first met when I was a research assistant at Long Point, Ontario in 1991 and he was living in the area. A great, incredibly knowledgeable guy, well-respected in the field community for his field skills he had recently left Fieldguides Inc. to go solo with his travel company Alvaro’s Adventures,  http://alvarosadventures.com  and part of his operation includes running several CA pelagic trips throughout the year that have produced a burgeoning list of seabirds that have included such vagrants as Hawaiian Petrel, Short-tailed Albatross, White-chinned Petrel, Great-winged Petrel and MANY Laysan Albatrosses.

One of the first notable differences from the other pelagics, was complimentary coffee and croissants on the boat as we waited to get underway..nice touch! Alvaro ran a nice trip, engaged with all the participants and gave an educational running commentary about the birds and marine life of Half Moon Bay. A nice trip with a great selection of birds, and I would thoroughly recommend anyone taking a trip out west to take advantage of the convenience of Half Moon Bay trips with Alvaro.

To book e-mail : alvaro@alvarosadventures.com;  or call 650-504-7779.

Click Images for original size

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Several dapper, pterodroma-patterned Buller’s Shearwaters were seen in good numbers

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Great looks at this Pomarine Jaeger with “spooners”. Being a rather northerly wintering jaeger, Pomarines, unlike Parasitic and Long-tailed, begin primary moult in the early fall – this bird is moulting its inner primaries. Dark underwings lacking any barred feathers suggest it is an adult and the breast band and barred flanks suggest it is a female.

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An adult Parasitic Jaeger attempting to kleptoparasitize a worried adult Sabine’s Gull!

Killer looks at many Black-footed Albatrosses

Killer looks at many Black-footed Albatrosses

South Polar Skua...one of two birds seen that unfortunately did not come into the boat and did a hit and run!

South Polar Skua…one of two birds seen that unfortunately did not come into the boat and did a hit and run!

Pillar Point, near Half Moon Bay.

Pillar Point, near Half Moon Bay.

Species List:
Black-footed Albatross
Pink-footed Shearwater
Buller’s Shearwater
Sooty Shearwater
Manx Shearwater
Brandt’s Cormorant
Red-necked Phalarope
South Polar Skua
Pomarine Jaeger
Pomarine/Parasitic Jaeger
Common Murre
Rhinoceros Auklet
Western Gull
California Gull
Wilson’s Storm-Petrel
Ashy Storm-Petrel
Black Storm-Petrel
Red Phalarope
Pomarine Jaeger
Common Murre
Cassin’s Auklet
Rhinoceros Auklet
Sabine’s Gull
Western Gull
California Gull
Arctic Tern
Pacific Loon
Common Loon

Pacific White-sided Dolphin
Northern Right Whale Dolphin
Humpback Whale
Ocean Sunfish Mola mola

PLANNED IT, BOOKED IT…DOING IT!

July 3, 2013
Buller's Shearwater

Buller’s Shearwater

CALIFORNIA FALL 2013 – A Plethora of Pelagics – West Coast-style!

Phil Rusch, Nick Bonomo, Simon Harvey and myself are planning an assault on the wilds of north-central California in September, centered around some pelagics out of Monterey and Half Moon Bay.

I have never been out of Half Moon Bay, a place I have visited before but never from a pelagic perspective. We are taking to the seas from here courtesy of an old friend Alvaro Jaramillo, known to many as a well-respected field birder and all-around top-man!

He recently set up his own tour business, Alvaro’s Adventures, http://alvarosadventures.com/ and part of his operation includes running several CA pelagic trips throughout the year that have produced a burgeoning list of seabirds that have included such vagrants as Hawaiian Petrel, Short-tailed Albatross, White-chinned Petrel, Great-winged Petrel and MANY Laysan Albatrosses.

Albatrosses HMB AJ1

Black-footed and Laysan Albatrosses – the latter is my nemesis bird!

To book e-mail : alvaro@alvarosadventures.com;  or call 650-504-7779

Check out a pelagic slide show here: http://alvarosadventures.com/2012/09/half-moon-bay-pelagic-slide-show-sept-2-2012/

Scripp's-Murrelete

Scripp’s Murrelet

Pink-foot AJ

Pink-footed Shearwater

Similar birds can be seen out of Monterey, 2 hours to the south, but the proximity (30 minutes to an hour depending on traffic) to San Francisco airport is a huge plus for out-of-towners like us that need to do a pelagic then catch a red-eye back to the east coast.

Brookline Pelagic, August 2012

September 9, 2012

A Connecticut contingent of Frank Mantlik, Frank Gallo, Nick Bonomo and myself road-tripped to Hyannis to participate in the Brookline Bird Club’s annual extreme pelagic out of Hyannis. After a few hours sleep we assembled at the dock and were joined by fellow CT birders John Oshlik and Phil Rusch and a boatload, literally, of birders from New England.

From (l) to (r): Julian Hough, Frank Gallo, Phil Rusch, Nick Bonomo and Frank Mantlik.

As with any pelagic, hopes are always high for a mega-rarity and the reality is always more sobering than the fantasy. However, on this trip, expectations were met..and exceeded, in what was regarded as THE best pelagic in Massachusetts history and one of the best trips most birders had been on in the Atlantic!

So, without much further ado, here’s a few photos of mine from the trip. CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGES.

Long-tailed Jaeger – intermediate-type juvenile. Note long central tail feathers, zebra-striped undertail coverts and characteristic 2 pale primary shafts.

Red-necked Phalaropes. Slim build with well-defined wingbar that is slightly narrower than Red Phalarope. Differences hard to notice on fast-moving birds at sea.

Great Shearwater. Lots of great looks!

Scopoli’s Shearwater. Typically smaller and slighter than ‘borealis’ with more white ‘fingers’ evident on the primaries. (Difference is similar to the differences in underwing pattern of Sooty vs. Bridled Tern.) Difficult to determine underwing pattern in the field, with a review of digital images often needed. Some smaller birds seen resting proved to be borealis so size wasn’t often a clincher.

Leach’s Petrel

Band-rumped Petrel

Band-rumped Petrel

White-faced Storm Petrel. Nuff Said.

Steve Howell and leader Marshall Iliff talking minutiae.

26th August – Day 2.

After an overnight anchor at the canyons, dawn and coffee was welcomed. As light was breaking Nick spotted a small shearwater coming in which quickly turned into a stunning, world lifer Barolo Shearwater!!!

Barolo Shearwater. Small size, small bill with white face with dark eye standing out. Blackish above and snow white below with extensive white on the underwings, neatly rimmed with black. Upperparts lacking pale median tips and silvery wash of adults, indicating a juvenile bird. Only the 2nd/3rd record for Mass and the 1oth/11th record for the US.

Nick Bonomo, obviously happy at ticking off Blair Nikula (left)..or maybe the Barolo Shearwater that just nearly flew into the back of the boat!!

Tom Johnson needed a calculator to add up the number of Barolo Shearwaters he’s now seen in the past week! Scoring 4 off his NOAA research cruise off Nova Scotia last week fuelled expectations that this trip might deliver, but nobody thought it would!

Feeling a rush of adrenalin, I decided it was time for me to pay a visit to the bog. I had just got settled, when everyone started shouting and James Smith banged on the door..”Tropicbird, Tropicbiirrrdddd!!!!”. I thought Holy S!!$$$..literally, right now. White-tailed Tropicbird was a nemesis bird for me, so I couldn’t believe it. Busting out onto the back deck, I was confronted with a stunning juv. tropicbird winnowing overhead!

Red-billed Tropicbird- juvenile. A stunning bird. Black inner greater covert pattern identified this as a Red-billed rather than the expected (and hoped-for White-tailed).

Pomarine Jaeger- 1stsummer.

Audubon’s Shearwater. Note long tail, dusky undertail coverts, stout bill, dark lores and extensively dark primary bases.

Manx Shearwater. Torpedo shaped body with long bill, dark earcoverts, Compared to Barolo and Audubon’s it seemed quite brutish.

Highlights:

1 or 2 BAROLO SHEARWATERS

“SCOPOLI’S” CORY’S SHEARWATERS

1 RED-BILLED TROPICBIRD (juvenile over the boat)

1 BRIDLED TERN, on flotsam next to the boat at sunset 8/25

7 WHITE-FACED STORM-PETRELS – excellent views by all

9 BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETRELS – excellent views by all

3 AUDUBON’S SHEARWATERS

1 LONG-TAILED JAEGER (juvenile)

4+ POMARINE JAEGERS

Black Terns (many)

100+ Red-necked Phalarops

2-3 Red Phalaropes

10+ Hudsonian Godwits migrating

1 Finback Whale

Common Dolphins

Mola mola

Sharks

2 Loggerhead Sea Turtles

1 Leatherback Sea Turtle

Portuguese Man-o-War

Flying Fish

19th March – All at Sea from Galilee!

March 22, 2011

A hardy group of CT and Rhode Island birders set sail on a Frances Fleet Charter out of Galilee, Rhode Island on a dedicated pelagic trip. A nice mix of people, superb weather and a decent show of alcids made for a pleasant day on the Ocean, even if we didn’t connect with a Great Skua or anything of that ilk.

I was hoping to photograph some winter alcids and to brush up on my rusty  id. skills, especially since I haven’t seen many alcids in the last decade!  Many of the trains of alcids were distant and it was hard in these real-life field conditions to see any really well. General shape and color rendered most of them Razorbills, but separating out Common Murre from these birds whizzing by was tough.

Capturing a flock of Razorbills like this digitally allows a better assessment of size and structure and plumage marks- all of which are basically tough to assess and compare under pelagic conditions with distant birds. Also note here that the first-winter birds (eg. third from right) have much slimmer bills than the adults. (CLICK IMAGE FOR LARGER VIEW)

Did you notice the Common Murre mixed in with the flock  in the first photo?? I didn’t notice it at the time either, only after looking at the photos did it pop-out..just goes to show. Here’s the same flock..can you pick it out? Note the rather flat-back and horizontal profile to the Razorbills. The thick bills and blocky heads lend a front-heavy appearance, while the Common Murre has a longer body with a “hunch-back” and longer feet (difficult to determine on most views in the field).  Unlike Razorbill, they look slightly more pear-shaped with the weight of the body at the rear. The Common Murre is the 4th from the left. Also in the top photo, note the dark “thumbprint” on the axillaries compared with the relatively white-looking armpits of the Razorbills. (CLICK IMAGE FOR LARGER VIEW)

Head patterns of winter alcids (from l to r): Thick-billed, Razorbill and Common Murre (Julian Hough). Note bill shape and shape and extent of white behind the eye.

Thankfully, a few close Dovekies played ball and everyone was able to get good looks at these flying tennis balls. A US lifer for yours-truly and a species I had only seen a handful of before in the UK (is two a handful, and if the first was in a box, does it count?)

Munching away on some chocolate-covered pretzels at the stern, I noticed an alcid approaching. Upon lifting my bins, I noticed a complete breast band before it turned and gave away a compact plump-bellied look..not a Razorbill, not a murre…big bill….it’s a….”PUFFIN!!” came the shout from Glenn Williams on the deck above. The bird whirred by at distance, crossed the bow and was gone, gone, gone. A good showing of  Gannets, peppered by small, northward-bound groups of Red-throated Loons were noteworthy but not too exciting.  No Brunnich’s Guillemots could be picked out – a species I had hoped to see on this trip, but being scarce my hopes were not that hight to begin with.

Everyone was a pleasant and it was good to put some faces to names. Keith “trigger-finger” Mueller and his wife Jen were good fun and Keith gave everyone a set of fabulous duck stamp prints he had done for Rhode Island. Finally,  a brutish-looking Iceland Gull greeted us at the dock as we arrived back at Galilee. A nice finale to a great day.

CT Birder Frank Mantlik in action

Top-deck lookouts!

 

 

Main highlights:

1 ATLANTIC PUFFIN
12 DOVEKIES,
21 COMMON MURRE
115 Razorbills,
65 large Alcid Sp.
160 Northern Gannets
1 LITTLE GULL
1 Black-legged Kittiwake
9 Bonaparte’s Gulls

2 Iceland Gull
27 Common Loon
45 Red-throated Loons
23 White-winged
8 Black
5 Surf Sc oters
1 Long-tailed Duck