Ardenna Overload

19th-20th August Cape Cod, Massachusetts

L to r: Nick Bonomo, Phil Rusch, Me, Luke Seitz, Peter Trimble and Dave Provencher

(Click on Images for Hi-Res versions)

With our annual overnight pelagic being weathered out, several of us decided to head up to the Cape to do some birding, especially as we had kindly been given floor space at Peter Trimble’s home.

So, Dave Provencher, Phil Rusch and myself met up at 4 am in Mystic, CT and drove up to Race Point, Provincetown, meeting Nick Bonomo and Luke Seitz en route. There had been a nice showing of shearwaters at Race Point, along with jaegers and, as we had found out, even a South Polar Skua had been seen flying up the beach!

Stopping for a quick coffee, we soon arrived at the parking lot that was lightly shrouded in fog – not good, since that would hamper visibility offshore. Nick had called to say that they were two miles down the beach. We were saved from a long walk by Blair Nikula who kindly came and picked us up and brought us back down to the beach. When we arrived, we had no idea what an amazing spectacle we were about to experience. Feeding right in the surf was a mass of feeding Great Shearwaters, thousands of them…there were birds everywhere. They were feeding on a huge amount of small fish, bunker or Menhaden, that had been pushed inshore.

Blair Nikula and Jeremiah Trimble ankle-deep in Great Shearwaters

Great Shearwater over oily water

As we all stood there, not quite being able to take it all in, we noticed there were not just Great, but Cory’s, Sooty and Manx Shearwaters! Then somebody shouted “SABINE’S!!”

Adult Sabine’s Gull – a dapper bird!

A dapper ad Sabine’s Gull flew out of the gloom and alighted in the water in front of us. My first east coast Sabine’s, it showed well during the morning. Several Roseate Terns and Black Terns paraded by, all against a swarming melee of shearwaters. Foggy conditions made for tough photography, but standing in the surf, surrounded by Great Shearwaters while Cory’s flew up the beach behind us was a surreal experience.

Who needs a boat?

“Hey..get out of the way!” Cory’s Shearwater in the surf..

Manx Shearwater

Manx Shearwater

The rest of the crew went to check out a shorebird, and Blair and I stayed by the car. At this point, I noticed a small, slim-winged Cory’s-type shearwater, which from photos looked good for Scopoli’s! It was distant, but the underwing seemed to fit! Almost at the same time, Blair shouted, “SABINE’S”. Surprisingly, this time it turned out to be a fresh juvenile!! It flew close and landed offshore.

Juvenile Sabine’s Gull..my first Sabine’s in the east…

I texted the others, who soon rejoined us, and over the next hour we photographed a few more apparent Scopoli’s, surely one, if not the only time, this species/subspecies has been identified from shore?

Apparent Scopoli’s Shaearwater (top left) with a Cory’s Shearwater. Apparently no plumage or size differences are useful (except for some small females?) and the underwing pattern of many Scopoli’s-types is variable. Some have extensive white extending onto the primary bases, but hiow much is enough…

We walked down the beach back to the main parking area, noting a 2nd-cycle Parasitic Jaeger, more Roseate Terns and thousands and thousands more shearwaters!

Second-cycle Parasitic Jaeger

Click here for the ebird checklist

We stopped for lunch and continued to Chatham to try for a Little Stint that had been present for several days. We soon found the bird feeding in a shallow, wet area. We essentially had the bird to ourselves and with some crawling and scurrying through the mud, we were able to field craft the heck out of it and obtain some nice images.

Adult Little Stint, Chatham, Mass. A pretty straightforward identification. I always remain skeptical of claims of juveniles in the east in fall. I am not aware of any except for a bird at Cape May in September 1982. I wonder if that record would stand up to review today in lieu of any other sightings..

Nick getting up close and personal…

20th August – Monomoy

So, after some early morning fun with a brazen skunk, the plan was to take Nick’s boat out to Harwichport and zoom out to Monomoy. This used to be more accessible back in the 90s but unless you have a boat, you can’t get out there now. This has to be one of the best shorebird spots in the east. I had seen a Bar-tailed Godwit out here way back when, and it is known as a July staging ground for Hudsonian Godwits before they jump off into the Atlantic and head south.  We anchored the boat and headed off to the powder hole, a brackish, tidal  pool good for shorebirds. It was a great, birdy spot we had to ourselves, but diversity was low.

Birding the Powder Hole on Monomoy

We had good looks at some Roseate and Black Terns, and a sprinkling of commoner species, but nothing of note. It had gotten hot, so we headed back.

Lunch anyone?? Nice bit of baked Seal…yummy!!

Stopping off at Minimoy, there were tons of birds on the falling tide. Unfortunately, we had no time for landing, especially since we may have gotten the boat stuck. Luke jumped out to scope the distant flock, picking out Marbled and Hudsonian, but they were really distant. We had to be back that night, so we decided not to risk it.

So, although disappointing we never made it offshore, the weekend;s birding was more than a fitting consolation!

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One Response to “Ardenna Overload”

  1. Bob Flood Says:

    Awesome. Is it possible that I could use your 2C Parasitic Jaeger in an article in prep? Bob Flood

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